opioid dependence

Helpful Links

There are many resources available to you and your support network to better understand and cope with opioid dependence. Some resources, like the American Board of Addiction Medicine and the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, can refer you to local addiction specialists and healthcare providers for treatment. Check out some of the recommended sites below.

These helpful links are provided as a public service and are for informational purposes only. No endorsement is made or implied.

American Board of Addiction Medicine

The American Board of Addiction Medicine is the nation’s first medical specialty board that certifies addiction medicine physicians across a range of specialties with the mission to increase access to and to improve the quality of addiction treatment.

abam.net

American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology

The American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology is a not-for-profit corporation that promotes excellence in practice through certification and maintenance of certification processes, and is a member of the American Board of Medical Specialties.

abpn.com
American Society of Addiction Medicine

The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), founded in 1954, is a professional medical society representing over 5000 physicians, clinicians, and associated professionals in the field of addiction medicine. ASAM is dedicated to increasing access and improving the quality of addiction treatment, educating physicians and the public, supporting research and prevention, and promoting the appropriate role of physicians in the care of patients with addiction.

asam.org
National Institute on Drug Abuse

The mission of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is to lead the nation in bringing the power of science to bear on drug abuse and addiction.

drugabuse.gov
Medicaid

Medicaid is a federal government program for families and individuals with low income and resources. Medicaid.gov provides state-by-state information on eligibility and enrollment.

medicaid.gov

Medicare

Medicare is a national social insurance program that guarantees access to health insurance for Americans aged 65 and older and people with disabilities. Medicare.gov offers information on Medicare coverage and plans as well as additional helpful resources.

medicare.gov
The National Alliance of Advocates for Buprenorphine Treatment

The National Alliance of Advocates for Buprenorphine Treatment (NAABT) is a nonprofit organization charged with the mission to educate the public about the disease of opioid dependence and treatment with buprenorphine.

naabt.org
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration was established by Congress in 1992 to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness in American communities.

samhsa.gov

Ask your healthcare provider
about ZUBSOLV!

What is ZUBSOLV® (buprenorphine and naloxone) sublingual tablet (CIII)?

ZUBSOLV is a prescription medicine used to treat opioid addiction in adults and is part of a complete treatment program that also includes counseling and behavioral therapy.

Important Safety Information

What is the most important information I should know about ZUBSOLV?

  • ZUBSOLV contains an opioid called buprenorphine that can cause serious and life-threatening breathing problems, especially if you take or use certain other medicines or drugs. Get emergency help right away if you feel faint, feel dizzy, are confused, feel sleepy or uncoordinated, have blurred vision, have slurred speech, are breathing slower than normal, cannot think well or clearly.

  • Talk to your healthcare provider about naloxone, which is a medicine that is available to patients for the emergency treatment of an opioid overdose, including accidental use of ZUBSOLV by a child. If naloxone is given, you must still call 911 or get emergency medical help right away to treat an overdose or accidental use of an opioid. In an emergency, have family members tell emergency department staff that you are physically dependent on an opioid and being treated with ZUBSOLV.

  • Do not take ZUBSOLV with certain medicines. Taking ZUBSOLV with other opioid medicines, benzodiazepines, alcohol, or other central nervous system depressants (including street drugs) can cause severe drowsiness, decreased awareness, breathing problems, coma, and death.

  • Do not inject (“shoot up”) ZUBSOLV. Injecting ZUBSOLV may cause life-threatening infections, other serious health problems, and sudden serious withdrawal symptoms such as pain, cramps, vomiting, diarrhea, anxiety, sleep problems, and cravings.

  • Do not switch from ZUBSOLV to other medicines that contain buprenorphine without talking with your healthcare provider. The amount of buprenorphine in a dose of ZUBSOLV is not the same as other medicines that contain buprenorphine.

  • Do not stop taking ZUBSOLV suddenly. You could become sick and have withdrawal symptoms because your body has become used to the medicine (physical dependence). Physical dependence is not the same as drug addiction.

  • Never give anyone else your ZUBSOLV. They could die from taking it. Selling or giving away ZUBSOLV is against the law. Store ZUBSOLV securely, out of sight and reach of children, and in a location not accessible by others, including visitors to the home.

Who should not take ZUBSOLV?

  • Do not take ZUBSOLV if you are allergic to buprenorphine or naloxone.

What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking ZUBSOLV?

Before taking ZUBSOLV, tell your healthcare provider:

  • about all of your medical conditions and all of the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, or herbal supplements.

  • if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. If you take ZUBSOLV while pregnant, your baby may have symptoms of opioid withdrawal at birth that could be life-threatening if not recognized and treated.

  • if you are breastfeeding. ZUBSOLV can pass into your breast milk and harm your baby. Talk to your healthcare provider about the best way to feed your baby if you take ZUBSOLV. Monitor your baby for increased drowsiness and breathing problems if you breastfeed during treatment with ZUBSOLV.

What are the possible side effects of ZUBSOLV?

ZUBSOLV can cause serious side effects, including:

  • Trouble breathing. Taking ZUBSOLV with other opioid medicines, benzodiazepines, alcohol, or other central nervous system depressants can cause breathing problems that can lead to coma or death.

  • Sleepiness, dizziness, and problems with coordination.

  • Physical dependence or abuse.

  • Liver problems. Call your healthcare provider right away if you notice any of these symptoms: your skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow (jaundice), dark or “tea-colored” urine, light colored stools (bowel movements), loss of appetite, pain, aching, or tenderness on the right side of your stomach area, nausea. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check the liver before you start and while you are taking ZUBSOLV.

  • Allergic reaction. Call your healthcare provider or get emergency help right away if you have a rash, hives, swelling of your face, wheezing, low blood pressure or loss of consciousness.

  • Opioid withdrawal. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get any of these symptoms: shaking, sweating more than normal, feeling hot or cold more than normal, runny nose, watery eyes, goose bumps, diarrhea, vomiting, muscle aches.

  • Decrease in blood pressure. You may feel dizzy if you get up too fast from sitting or lying down.

  • The most common side effects of ZUBSOLV include: headache, nausea, vomiting, constipation, pain, increased sweating, decrease in sleep (insomnia).

  • ZUBSOLV may affect fertility in males and females. Talk to your healthcare provider if this is a concern for you.

For additional safety information, click here for Prescribing Information and Medication Guide and discuss with your healthcare provider.

To report negative side effects associated with taking ZUBSOLV, please call 1-888-982-7658. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.