opioid dependence

Helpful Links

There are many resources available to you and your support network to better understand and cope with opioid dependence. Some resources, like the American Board of Addiction Medicine and the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, can refer you to local addiction specialists and physicians for treatment. Check out some of the recommended sites below.

These helpful links are provided as a public service and are for informational purposes only. No endorsement is made or implied.

American Board of Addiction Medicine

The American Board of Addiction Medicine is the nation’s first medical specialty board that certifies addiction medicine physicians across a range of specialties with the mission to increase access to and to improve the quality of addiction treatment.

abam.net

American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology

The American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology is a not-for-profit corporation that promotes excellence in practice through certification and maintenance of certification processes, and is a member of the American Board of Medical Specialties.

abpn.com
American Society of Addiction Medicine

The American Society of Addiction Medicine is a professional society of physicians dedicated to increasing access to and improving the quality of addiction treatment, educating physicians, increasing public awareness, and supporting the research and prevention of addiction.

asam.org
National Institute on Drug Abuse

The mission of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is to lead the nation in bringing the power of science to bear on drug abuse and addiction.

drugabuse.gov
Medicaid

Medicaid is a federal government program for families and individuals with low income and resources. Medicaid.gov provides state-by-state information on eligibility and enrollment.

medicaid.gov

Medicare

Medicare is a national social insurance program that guarantees access to health insurance for Americans aged 65 and older and people with disabilities. Medicare.gov offers information on Medicare coverage and plans as well as additional helpful resources.

medicare.gov
The National Alliance of Advocates for Buprenorphine Treatment

The National Alliance of Advocates for Buprenorphine Treatment (NAABT) is a nonprofit organization charged with the mission to educate the public about the disease of opioid dependence and treatment with buprenorphine.

naabt.org
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration was established by Congress in 1992 to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness in American communities.

samhsa.gov

Ask your doctor about ZUBSOLV!

What is ZUBSOLV®?

ZUBSOLV® (buprenorphine and naloxone) sublingual tablet (CIII) is a prescription medicine used to treat adults who are addicted to opioid drugs (either prescription or illegal) as part of a complete treatment program that also includes counseling and behavioral therapy.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

  • Do not take ZUBSOLV if you are allergic to buprenorphine or naloxone as serious negative side effects, including anaphylactic shock, have been reported.

  • ZUBSOLV can cause serious and life-threatening breathing problems. Call your doctor right away or get emergency help if (a) you feel faint, dizzy, or confused; (b) your breathing gets much slower than is normal for you; (c) you feel sleepy and uncoordinated; (d) you have blurred vision; (e) you have slurred speech; (f) you cannot think well or clearly; or (g) you have slowed reflexes and breathing. In an emergency, have family members tell the emergency department staff that you are physically dependent on an opioid and are being treated with ZUBSOLV.

  • ZUBSOLV contains buprenorphine, an opioid that can cause physical dependence with chronic use. Physical dependence is not the same as addiction. Your doctor can tell you more about the difference between physical dependence and addiction. Do not stop taking ZUBSOLV without talking to your doctor. You could become sick with uncomfortable withdrawal signs and symptoms because your body has become used to this medicine.

  • Your doctor may monitor liver function before and during treatment with ZUBSOLV.

  • ZUBSOLV is not recommended for initiation of treatment in patients with moderate hepatic impairment due to the increased risk of precipitated withdrawal. However, ZUBSOLV may be used with caution for maintenance treatment in patients with moderate hepatic impairment who have initiated treatment on a buprenorphine product without naloxone.

  • Keep ZUBSOLV in a secure place away from children. If a child accidentally takes ZUBSOLV, this is a medical emergency and can result in death. Get emergency help right away.

  • The most common side effects of ZUBSOLV include: headache, drug withdrawal syndrome, nausea, decrease in sleep (insomnia), vomiting, pain, increased sweating, swelling of the extremities, and constipation. Tell your doctor about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

  • Opioid use may cause adrenal insufficiency, a potentially life-threatening condition. Seek immediate medical attention if you experience nausea, vomiting, anorexia, fatigue, weakness, dizziness, or low blood pressure as these are signs and symptoms that may be associated with adrenal insufficiency.

  • Do not switch from ZUBSOLV to other medicines that contain buprenorphine without talking with your doctor. The amount of buprenorphine in a dose of ZUBSOLV is not the same as the amount of buprenorphine in other medicines that contain buprenorphine. Your doctor will prescribe a starting dose of buprenorphine that may be different than other buprenorphine-containing medicines you may have been taking.

  • ZUBSOLV is not for occasional or ““as needed”” use. An overdose, and even death, can happen if you take benzodiazepines, sedatives, tranquilizers, or alcohol while using ZUBSOLV. Ask your doctor what you should do if you are taking one of these. You should not drink alcohol while taking ZUBSOLV, as this can lead to loss of consciousness or even death.

  • Do not inject (“”shoot-up””) ZUBSOLV. Injecting ZUBSOLV may cause life-threatening infections and other serious health problems. Injecting ZUBSOLV may cause serious withdrawal symptoms such as pain, cramps, vomiting, diarrhea, anxiety, sleep problems, and cravings.

  • Before taking ZUBSOLV, tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

  • Cases of serotonin syndrome, a rare but potentially life-threatening condition, have been reported when opioids are used along with serotonergic drugs (such as medications used to treat depression and migraines). Be sure to inform your doctor if you are taking or plan to take any serotonergic medications while taking ZUBSOLV.

  • Before taking ZUBSOLV, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. If you take ZUBSOLV while pregnant, your baby may have signs of withdrawal at birth and that withdrawal is treatable. Talk to your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

  • Before taking ZUBSOLV, tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. Nursing mothers: Caution should be exercised when buprenorphine-containing products are administered to a nursing woman. Talk to your doctor about the best way to feed your baby. If you take ZUBSOLV, monitor your baby for drowsiness and difficulty breathing.

  • Chronic use of opioids may cause reduced fertility. It is not known whether these effects on fertility are reversible.

  • Do not drive, operate heavy machinery, or perform any other dangerous activities until you know how ZUBSOLV affects you. Buprenorphine can cause drowsiness and slow reaction times. This may happen more often in the first few weeks of treatment when your dose is being changed, but can also happen if you drink alcohol or take other sedative drugs when you take ZUBSOLV.

  • ZUBSOLV is a controlled substance (CIII) because it contains buprenorphine, which can be a target for people who abuse prescription medicines or street drugs. Keep your ZUBSOLV in a safe place to protect it from theft. Never give your ZUBSOLV to anyone else; it can cause death or harm them. Selling or giving away this medicine is against the law.

This is not a complete list of negative side effects associated with ZUBSOLV. For a complete list please see full Prescribing Information.

To report negative side effects associated with taking ZUBSOLV, please call 1-888-982-7658. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

For more information about ZUBSOLV (buprenorphine and naloxone) Sublingual Tablet (CIII), please see the respective full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide.